Pebble Creek, ID

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8 thoughts on “Pebble Creek, ID

  1. dxhdx h December 9, 2017 / 2:05 pm

    Skyline was relocated, not aspen.

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    • Peter Landsman December 9, 2017 / 5:24 pm

      Weren’t they both? I have Yan’s entire installation record and it shows nothing for Pebble Creek.

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      • dxhdx h December 10, 2017 / 3:22 pm

        Well Aspen has the sketchy Yan mid 1980s sheaves, so it must’ve only been at it’s original location for a year or two at most.

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      • Max Hart December 10, 2017 / 4:15 pm

        Aspen doesn’t have the sketchy “Yan 1980s sheaves”. Here’s an example of the Yan 1980s sheaves found on some fixed grip lifts (a similar version was also used on detachable quads and later fixed grip lifts): https://liftblog.com/2016/10/17/at-sundance-doppelmayr-races-to-replace-arrowhead-lift-in-95-days/#jp-carousel-32762

        The Aspen triple, which was relocated from Mammoth Mountain, CA, is likely the 1979 Chair 19. This lift was a double during its time at Mammoth and the date of its removal is unknown. The drive terminal, return terminal, and towers all have features that were found on Yan lifts of Chair 19’s vintage, such as counterweight tensioning located away from the tensioned terminal, lack of lifting frames, the swing guards on the sheave assemblies, and the welded on ladder. This lift has all the features of a 1979 Yan double, and being from Mammoth, it is only possible that this is the former Chair 19. It was in its original location for only five years.

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      • dxhdx h December 10, 2017 / 4:22 pm

        Max Hart,
        The bottom sheaves of Aspen are very similar to the bottom sheaves of Arrowhead (RIP).

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      • Max Hart December 10, 2017 / 4:39 pm

        That style of depression sheaves were used on Yan lifts from the late 1960s to the mid-late 1980s. I was referring to the support sheaves found on the towers, which were used mostly during the 1970s (the swing guard gives it away) and were ultimately replaced by the sketchy sheaves, which are the aluminum ones with the black hubcaps found on Arrowhead.

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      • Collin December 10, 2017 / 6:17 pm

        Why are those the “sketchy sheaves”.

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      • Max Hart December 11, 2017 / 8:43 am

        They were made of aluminum and were prone to cracking.

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