Rangeley – Saddleback, ME

Tower 1 for the new Rangeley lift, which replaced a Mueller double upon the mountain’s reopening.
Loading area and short maintenance rail.
Side view of the Uni-G-M base terminal.
Lower station area with RFID gates.
Looking up the lift line.
The base area.
View up at tower 5.
Middle part of the lift line.
Tower 7.
T8.
The bottom terminal is near the top of South Branch.
The return terminal.
Top station with a view of Rangeley Lake.
Unloading area.
Uni-G station and Doppelmayr operator house.
Side view of the top terminal.
Another view of the upper station.
View down near the top.
The lift alignment.
Doppelmayr EJ chair with DT-104 grip.
Tower 11.
Upper part of the lift line.
Controls in the motor room.
Inside the terminal.
Motor and two diesel engines.
The lower station.

9 thoughts on “Rangeley – Saddleback, ME

  1. Joe Blake November 27, 2020 / 9:12 pm

    Two diesels? What is this, Whatcom County?

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    • Robert West November 28, 2020 / 9:02 am

      Most ordered like that now. 1 high HP Diesel prime mover and one smaller APU.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Joe Blake November 29, 2020 / 5:37 pm

        That makes total sense. I guess I was thinking too hard, assuming twin opposing 3208 or similar. Petrol tertiary drives were common back in the day, but I’ve not been in motor rooms in a couple decades. Diesel is much more efficient and most joints have much thousands of gallons on hand at all times, too, also. Carry on!

        Like

  2. Tom White November 28, 2020 / 4:58 am

    Correction: The lake seen near the base is Saddleback Lake. The caption is wrong (13 down). The much larger Rangeley Lake is to the west, out of view. Otherwise, thanks Peter for getting these pictures up.

    Like

  3. Alex Kennedy February 15, 2021 / 9:49 pm

    Are these sheave designs going to be used on all new Doppelmayr lifts? I personally think the old ones were better.

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    • pbropetech July 20, 2021 / 9:03 am

      Which sheave designs? Did you work on the older ones?

      Like

    • Keegan July 20, 2021 / 9:05 am

      Are you talking about the older dopp/CTEC sheaves?

      Like

  4. meirk April 7, 2021 / 7:06 am

    I’ve noticed that at the very end of the terminal there are two sets of lights (red, orange, green, with default being orange I think). I haven’t seen these on other lifts of this model, what are they for?

    Like

    • Mainely Skiing July 19, 2021 / 7:31 am

      Hello, I worked at this lift all winter and you might have even seen me out and about! I will break down the three lights of the stations.

      Red: Lift has stopped at that terminal. For example, if the red light is on at the top station, it means the top operator stopped the lift. The light won’t show up at the bottom because it’s not where the stop is.

      Orange: When this light is on, it will be on at both terminals, top and bottom. This light means there is a safety device that is not currently in use. If you remember when the crew from doppelmayr came and cut our haul rope, this created a problem in which our cable was too tight. This means we had to load every third chair for a few days and on the weekends to allow time for the rope to stretch out. During this time, our maintenance team decided it would be better for everyone if the lift ran without the extra bullwheel tensioning sensor. With this sensor off, it would make the orange light glow.

      Blue: When you see the blue light, it means there are high winds at that station. The lift has an automated wind sensor that will turn the light on when the wind in that terminal exceeds 35 miles an hour. The lift will shut off completely if one of the terminals exceeds or gets to 40 miles an hour for three or more seconds. You will also hear a chime. As a lift operator, we saw this light quite a bit on those wind hold days.

      Thank you and I hope that this helps answer your question!

      Hope to see you at Saddleback next year.

      – Keegan

      Liked by 1 person

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