Chair 4 – Silver Mountain, ID

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Approaching the mid-load station.
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Looking down the lower section of the lift line.
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Bottom vault drive terminal.
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Top unload.
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Mid-load station.
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Looking down the upper lift line.
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Lift line near the summit.
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Breakover towers.
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Top tension bullwheel.
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Special carrier for ski patrol sleds.
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Midway load station.
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7 thoughts on “Chair 4 – Silver Mountain, ID

  1. Spencer Meyer September 19, 2017 / 6:27 pm

    Did Riblet use the same tower/sheave design for all of its installations? Seems crazy to have a breakover feature that many towers. I’ve seen that on most of the Riblet chairs I’ve come across. I guess it would make manufacturing simpler.

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    • Donald Reif June 24, 2019 / 2:37 pm

      At least 13 of the 38 towers are just for the breakovers.

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    • Michael September 22, 2019 / 9:17 pm

      Up until about 1990 Riblet did not make a support sheave assembly that had more than 4 sheaves. So if the break over required 24 sheaves, they had to use 6 towers (6×4) where the other manufacturers would only use 3 (3×8).

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      • Donald Reif September 23, 2019 / 11:57 am

        Actually, make that the early 1980s. As evidenced by the fact that Breckenridge’s Lift E (built in 1982) has sheave assemblies of 8 to 12 sheaves on the uphill side of its towers.

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  2. Cameron Halmrast September 19, 2017 / 6:33 pm

    95% of them did. Riblet did experiment with a few different designs and those can be seen on the the Triple at Cuchara, Colorado, Peak 2 at Willamette Pass, Oregon and Naked Lady at Aspen Snowmass.

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    • Benjamin Eminger September 22, 2019 / 6:08 pm

      Bruin Lift at Iron Mountain CA has the same design as Peak 2 at Willamette Pass, but Iron Mountain has been defunct since 1995, but all the lifts are still there.

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  3. Donald Reif September 23, 2019 / 12:55 pm

    If a high speed quad replaced this, it would have to have a 90 degree load and run counterclockwise with the space limitations of that loading area.

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