Grey Mountain – Red Mountain, BC

This lift came via Alyeska and opened a major expansion area in 2013.
Poma Alpha bottom station.
Lift overview.
View up the lift line.
Poma grip, hanger and taco.
View down the first section.
Tower 8.
Breakover towers.
Unload ramp and return bullwheel.
Top station overview.
Many of the towers are extremely tall and this lift sometimes closes for wind.
View up the lift line.
Splice tower number 12.
Middle part of the lift line.
Another look down line.
Motor room.

14 thoughts on “Grey Mountain – Red Mountain, BC

  1. Cameron Halmrast July 1, 2018 / 6:57 pm

    Looks like this lift was designed to be upgraded to be a HSQ when it was originally installed at Alyeska based on its gauge.

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    • Greg April 14, 2020 / 5:30 pm

      Makes sense, as it was the only out-of-base lift.

      Like

    • Max Hart April 14, 2020 / 7:30 pm

      I think most if not all Poma fixed grip quads have the same ling gauge as their detachable quads. I’m not sure if that is the case with Omega series and LPA detachables, but it was at least before and during the use of the Challenger terminals.

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      • Meir K. April 15, 2020 / 9:00 am

        Wikipedia claims that both the Alpha and Delta (?) were designed to have the possibility for detachable conversion. Are there any examples of that anywhere?

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        • pbropetech April 15, 2020 / 10:58 am

          They were, as well as the super-simple vault-drive and single-mast return seen on a few lifts in the 80s (Midway Shuttle at Crystal, for example).

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      • pbropetech April 15, 2020 / 10:54 am

        You are correct. While some manufacturers seemed to use wider gauge for detaches, every Poma of several generations that I’ve worked on had the same. Makes economic sense, if nothing else; one standard towerhead regardless of lift speed. Occasionally there are exceptions, such as our Eagle telemix which has a wider line gauge than our Flyer standard sixpack because of swing clearance issues on the modified chairs.

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        • Will April 15, 2020 / 2:35 pm

          Responding to your comment “They were, as well as the super-simple vault-drive and single-mast return seen on a few lifts in the 80s (Midway Shuttle at Crystal, for example).”

          Are there examples of operating fixed grip quad chairs that look like this? If so, i’d love to see a picture of one.

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        • Will April 15, 2020 / 9:31 pm

          I know, I’ve skied at Loup Loup, a great spot.

          Just curious if there were any others.

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        • pbropetech April 17, 2020 / 10:46 am

          Pucci at Timberline.https://liftblog.com/pucci-timberline-lodge-or/ I looked all over remontees-mecaniques and racked my brain but I couldn’t find any other examples. Must have been a short-lived model, as the three North American detaches were that year.

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  2. John April 16, 2020 / 6:38 pm

    Just curious why they chose bottom drive and tension? Isn’t bottom drive less energy efficient?

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    • pbropetech April 17, 2020 / 7:09 am

      Yes, but that’s not the only factor in placing the drive. Access, power, operational considerations (a remote or roadless top terminal) all play a part in those decisions.

      Like

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