Northwoods Express #11 – Vail, CO

This Leitner-Poma six-pack replaced a Doppelmayr CLD-260 model quad in 2017.
The bottom return terminal.
Loading zone.
View down from tower 9.
Riding up.
Nearing the top.
View down the line.
Breakover towers 17-20.
Drive terminal arrival side.
Top station with maintenance rail. Notice the Doppelmayr chair hanging out!
Terminal underskin.
The big breakover.
View down line from near the summit.
Depression tower.
Middle section of the line.
Upper lift line view.
Tower 12.
T4.
Live overview.
Side view of the bottom station.
Lift overview.
Nearing the top terminal.
View down from the drive.
Top station overview.
Side view of the drive.
Lower station seen from Lift 6.
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16 thoughts on “Northwoods Express #11 – Vail, CO

  1. Peter Landsman January 22, 2018 / 4:10 pm

    Does anyone know the model name of these chairs? I think they are manufactured by Leitner in Telfs, Austria but not sure what they’re called.

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    • Collin January 22, 2018 / 4:15 pm

      I heard them referred to as the LPA-6-OC on Skilifts.org. OC stands for open carrier. There is also the LPA-6-CC, LPA-4-OC, and the LPA-4-CC. CC stands for closed carrier and those are what’s on the bubble chairs at Okemo and Mount Snow.

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  2. Michael January 22, 2018 / 5:10 pm

    The LPA 4/6 CC and OC carriers have a different Hanger to Bail connection than this carrier. I believe these are classified as “EEZ II” carriers and they are indeed manufactured at Leitner’s Production Facility at Telfs, Austria. To my knowledge their first appearance in North America was on Kensho Super Chair at Breckenridge, CO in 2013.

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  3. Collin January 22, 2018 / 5:21 pm

    The Kensho Superchair is the lift the person who said they were the LPA 6 OC was referring to. The Bluebird Express at Mount Snow is the first lift in North America with the CC. The other chair design LP offers is the Poma’s Omega design that debuted in 1996 and has been occasionally modified but only appeared this year on the Anakeesta pulse chondola and the fixed grip at Whitewater. All the detachables got the new chair design so they may only offer the Omega chair for fixed grips.

    I believe the LPA terminal design is a North American product only. Grips are Leitner, and the line gear and towers were originally the same as was used with the Omega terminals. It’s been changed since then but I still think it’s more Poma than Leitner. Hopefully Peter can confirm.

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    • Peter Landsman January 22, 2018 / 5:34 pm

      I believe Leitner-Poma of America has also supplied LPA lifts in France, New Zealand and possibly Australia. You are right Collin that the the first LPA lift (High Noon) used the previous generation tower and chair design. The new carriers, whatever they are called, seem to be the new standard and are a step above Doppelmayr’s EJ in terms of comfort. The color options are a nice bonus too.

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      • Collin January 22, 2018 / 5:47 pm

        It’s still a North American product since those terminals were built by Leitner Poma of America and not the European Leitner or Poma. The only LP lifts in the east with chairs other than the Omega are the bubble chairs at Mount Snow and Okemo, and they are very comfortable. Hopefully an eastern ski area gets the new non bubble chair design this year. The most recent non bubble LP lift in the east is the Adirondack Express 2 at Gore which was built in 2014 when they only offered the new design on 6 packs.

        One thing I don’t like about the LPA terminals is that I think the tire bank skins are plastic which is not as high quality as Doppelmayr’s all metal construction. Of course you can get the all wooden skins but only Breckenridge and Okemo have paid for them so far.

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        • Donald M. Reif February 3, 2019 / 5:33 pm

          Copper Mountain paid for the wood skins on American Eagle and American Flyer.

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  4. Michael January 22, 2018 / 5:28 pm

    Could have been me that made that statement about Kensho and as has happened in the past, I was wrong. It was the first time I had seen it and didn’t notice the difference in the connection….

    Liked by 1 person

  5. smacpats January 30, 2018 / 6:03 pm

    Picture #10 is similar to Sunrise Express at Stratton (CTEC Six pack), where there is still a single Fixed grip Poma service carrier from the Old Sunbowl quad. Its in a pretty bad spot, too, because on the days when they don’t put up liftline ropes, it blocks a small shortcut from Lower Downeaster onto the lift. I don’t have a picture unfortunately.

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    • tjskiloaf17 January 31, 2018 / 2:19 pm

      omg. we get it. you ski at stratton

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  6. Cooper April 7, 2018 / 12:56 pm

    Also on the first picture. CLD-260? That must be a HUGE chair. I know. Its a older doppelmayr chair model.

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    • Max Hart April 7, 2018 / 3:38 pm

      No, CLD-260 is the model of the entire system. I believe it stands for CLD (chair lift detachable) – 260 (26.0 meters long?). They used DS-104 grips. The chairs were either early EJs, the ’80s style bail carriers, or EJ bubble chairs.

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  7. J C G April 10, 2018 / 12:18 am

    260 refers to the gearbox size.

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  8. Donald M. Reif March 12, 2019 / 10:53 am

    This lift effectively replaced the last of the old 1980s lifts to run to Patrol Headquarters, with the High Noon Express (2010) and Mountaintop Express (2013) having been the first to get upgraded.

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  9. Donald M. Reif March 12, 2019 / 10:55 am

    The towers on the six pack are much lower in height than the original quad, resulting in several combi towers where there used to be tall support towers. In addition, there’s no combi tower on the final cliff climb. And the breakover has more towers than the original.

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  10. Donald M. Reif March 24, 2019 / 10:09 am

    Going back to Leitner-Poma for the Northwoods Express means Vail’s the only ski area in Colorado with multiple high speed six packs to have different manufacturers for their six packs (since the first two six packs were Doppelmayrs).

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