Gondola – Loon Mountain, NH

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Towers 1-2 and the bottom terminal building.
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A cabin departs the top terminal.
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Departure side of the top return terminal.
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Unloading area and turnaround.
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View down the line.
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Tower 17 near the summit.
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Doppelmayr tube tower with a re-used Hall tripod tower right next to it.
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Bottom terminal with bullwheel and chain-driven rails.
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View into the valley station.
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3 thoughts on “Gondola – Loon Mountain, NH

  1. Collin June 26, 2018 / 7:40 pm

    http://www.newenglandskiindustry.com/viewstory.php?storyid=699

    They’re going to replace the cabins this fall. My take is that this is a crazy bad investment. The one big problem in Loon’s lift system is that the gondola has horrible capacity and the cabins are too light so it shuts down for wind often. A new gondola with 8 passenger cabins and a higher capacity would eliminate the need to upgrade any of their other lifts and since their clientele prefers to ride the gondola over the chairs, it would be the best investment from a customer experience standpoint.

    Keep in mind this is all happening while Big Sky is getting one of the most expensive lifts North America has ever seen, and they’re hinting at getting even more D-Line lifts in future years. Meanwhile, Loon gets to keep their 30 year old main lift with less capacity than a double chair, but with slightly more comfortable cabins which means it won’t be replaced for a long long time. It made sense to replace cabins at Stratton and Killington since both are 8 passenger gondolas and have sufficient capacity, but Loon needs to fully replace the lift and at least double the capacity. I guess Boyne only cares about making these big PR splashes at Big Sky while they run their other resorts into the ground and fail to complete much needed upgrades. Look I’m all for more D-Line lifts being installed in North America, but not at the expense of the other resorts being low-balled or neglected. Since they’re ignoring this critical need for Loon, one can only infer that they will ignore other lift needs like Barker and Sunday River and either a new gondola or additional detachables at Sugarloaf.

    Boyne has no clue what they are doing.

    Sorry for the rant, but it’s gotta be said. Anyone else think this is a bad investment?

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    • Carleton June 28, 2018 / 10:32 am

      My first reaction is to agree with you. I don’t ski Loon very often and usually it’s on less crowded days – but the gondola always has a line. However, as someone else explained to me, on more crowded days, there isn’t enough room at the top (i.e trail options) for a higher capacity lift option. I agree with you that the fact that they are putting new cabins on, means the lift probably won’t be replaced in the next 10 years. Maybe they could space them a bit closer and fit a few more on…

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  2. xlr8r June 29, 2018 / 1:09 pm

    The trails off the top of the gondola cannot handle anymore traffic, and there is no way to widen the trails or cut more trails from there. Once you get down to where the Tote Road quad begins/ends, the trails can handle more traffic. I think Loon actually would have good traffic flow if there was no gondola, as long as 7 brothers was a detach quad. But that’s never going to happen because of all the summer business the gondola brings.

    The gondola is always going to feel cramped, new cabins or old being 4 passenger. The more important needs investment wise are upgrading the terminals to get rid of the chain contour and upgrade to tires. Also those towers have to be getting towards the end of their life as they are from the original gondola built over 50 years ago now. I think this is just Boyne trying to get some marketing, cheaper than actually making a meaningful lift investment like upgrading 7 Brothers to a detach. Besides being forced to replace Borvig lifts post accidents in Maine, Boyne has not made a lift investment in New England in the last 10 years.

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