Stowe, VT

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13 thoughts on “Stowe, VT

  1. Northeast Chairlifts February 27, 2018 / 4:37 pm

    Peter, would you happen to know what the fastest lift in North America is? I’m planning to measure Swain’s Double Chair speed soon.

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    • Collin February 27, 2018 / 4:44 pm

      There’s a whole bunch of gondolas rated to run 1200 fpm. Problem is most ski areas have since turned them down to 800-1000 fpm to save money. The fastest monocable gondola I know of by design speed is Cloudsplitter at Whiteface which is rated for 1212 fpm. I’m a Whiteface passholder and I have never seen it run anywhere near that speed, even on the busiest of days. The lift I’ve found to run at 1200 most often is the Telecabine Express at Tremblant. Runs that speed always unless weather issues prevent it like high winds or extreme cold.

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      • Northeast Chairlifts February 28, 2018 / 7:57 am

        I was talking about fixed grip lifts.

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    • Max Hart February 27, 2018 / 6:06 pm

      Already got it. Swain’s Borvig double is 2380 feet from the load point to the unload point, and 2446 feet overall (measurements from Google Earth). According to NorthEast Chairlift’s recording (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CjRzai7tNss) , the ride time was exactly 5 minutes from loading to unloading with no stops. 2380 ft / 5 min = exactly 476 fpm.

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      • Collin February 27, 2018 / 6:20 pm

        Google earth’s distances are always short as they don’t account for elevation. It is probably 500. Anything above is unloadable for most without a carpet.

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      • Max Hart February 27, 2018 / 6:51 pm

        Actually it was measuring slope length. I also have installation surveys from the 1960s until the 2000s, and Swain’s Double is listed. 1971 Borvig Double. It’s listed as 2400 feet long, 530 vertical feet, capacity of 1200 riders per hour, and a listed max operating speed of 465 fpm.

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      • Northeast Chairlifts February 28, 2018 / 7:58 am

        I think it’s faster than that. I’m gonna do it the simple way; use a gps speedometer.

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      • Peter Landsman February 28, 2018 / 10:37 am

        Does your GPS account for the fact that you are not moving across a flat plane? Probably not.

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      • Northeast Chairlifts February 28, 2018 / 7:29 pm

        Well the profile of the Double Chair is relatively flat in the middle-ish area, so I will just add a few more fpm to my calculation. Otherwise, I can’t do anything else.

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      • Northeast Chairlifts March 12, 2018 / 8:22 pm

        Decently close. 434 fpm. I also measured lifts at Greek peak yesterday.
        Lifts 1a and 4 we’re 434 fpm
        Lift 5 was 454 fpm
        Lift 2 was 394 fpm
        Lift 3 was not ridden

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    • Andrew February 27, 2018 / 7:10 pm

      Pretty sure its the Peak 2 Peak gondola in Whistler at 1476 FPM. It’s possible there’s a tram that’s faster thought.

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      • Andy March 13, 2018 / 4:30 am

        Can someone go and measure the uphill travel time on the Tram at Jay Peak in Vermont. The install books say it is 8000 feet ;long. The original travel speed (when new ) was 2000 FPM. Now that the full repairs are done, I imagine it is now allowed to travel at a higher speed, after years of being dialled down by regulators..

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  2. Galloway Frederick March 1, 2018 / 6:47 am

    Well I feel the same as you northeast, swains double moves a lot faster then any other double I have ridden for that matter triple or quad as well.

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