Buttercup Update from Mt. Hood Meadows

Many resorts are adding bigger chairlifts this season but Mt. Hood Meadows’ new beginner lift is notable for a couple reasons.  The quad follows an all-new route from the double it replaces, opening up more teaching terrain in the base area.  Second, it appears to feature Skytrac’s first height-adjustable terminal at its return station.  The drive and tensioning systems will now be located at the top.  The new Buttecup is 30 percent longer than the Yan version and will move 70 percent more people.  It will also spin 30 percent faster thanks to a loading carpet, which is also height adjustable.

When I stopped by Meadows this weekend, Mt. Hood had received nearly six inches of rain on top of early snow in classic Pacific Northwest fashion.  Timberline is already open for the season while lift construction continues next door.  Concrete work for the new lift is almost finished and the weather looks much better this week as Meadows prepares for its 50th season.

 

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9 thoughts on “Buttercup Update from Mt. Hood Meadows

  1. Carson October 23, 2017 / 6:36 pm

    How come the operator shacks are boarded up?

    Like

  2. Michael October 23, 2017 / 9:55 pm

    Transportation protection

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  3. Andy October 23, 2017 / 11:31 pm

    Second height adjustable top terminal. Ours is already up. ☺️

    Like

  4. Brian October 26, 2017 / 1:22 am

    Looks like the towers are now set.

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    • Peter Landsman October 26, 2017 / 11:07 am

      And the top terminal went up the day after I was there.

      Like

  5. Cameron Halmrast October 26, 2017 / 9:06 pm

    I’m surprised Timberline Helicopters hired to set so few towers and not a Mantis crane.

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    • Michael October 29, 2017 / 7:52 am

      A couple of possible reasons: 1) Timing 2) Availability of a Mantis crane 3) Forest Service restrictions 4) Negotiated contract

      Like

      • Andy October 29, 2017 / 4:14 pm

        One more possible reason could have been WET ground. The ground might have been too wet to support heavy equipment. We are dealing with the Pacific Northwest, which gets a lot of rain leading up the cold winter months, when it changes over to snow.

        Like

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