Venezuela Opening Record-Breaking Aerial Tramways to 15,633′

teleferico
Four Garaventa tramways ascending more than 10,000 vertical feet are set to open in Sierra Nevada National Park, Venezuela.  Photo credit: El Estímulo

The highest, longest and most expensive aerial tramway system in the world will open this month at the Sierra Nevada National Park in Northwestern Venezuela. Teleférico de Mérida, as it’s known in Spanish, is really four separate jig-backs built in series totaling a crazy 40,735 linear feet with a vertical rise of 10,464 feet.  Garaventa won a contract in 2011 to replace ropeways built along a similar route in the 1950s that closed down due to safety concerns in 2008.  The world-leader in tramways spent the last four years building four lifts that would each be notable but combine to form an unparalleled 7.8-mile journey from the town of Mérida to 15,633-foot Pico Espejo.  Of note, the world record for the longest tramway in a single section still belongs to the 3.5-mile Wings of Tatev, also built by Garaventa and completed in 2010.

Estación_Abandonada_Pico_Espejo_del_Teleférico_de_Mérida
The original trams and visitor center fell into disrepair and closed in 2008 after 48 years of operation in a high-alpine environment.  Photo credit: Wikipedia Commons

The four original ropeways at Mérida were built by Haeckel of Germany and Habbeger of Switzerland and opened in March 1960.  Interestingly, both of those companies came under ownership VonRoll and later the Doppelmayr Garaventa Group.  Seven 36-passenger cars carried riders to Pico Espejo until 2008, when Doppelmayr advised the Venezuelan government the tramways had reached the end of their useful life and needed to be replaced. The Venezuela Ministry of Tourism, which owns Teleférico de Mérida, opted to invest $468 million towards modern tramways and all-new facilities.

Teleferico_de_Merida,_Estacion_Loma_Redonda,_Venezuela
The original fourth section was a single-haul tramway built by Habegger and opened in 1960.  Photo credit: Wikipedia Commons

Continue reading

Advertisements