News Roundup: Project Status

News Roundup: Allegations

  • With energy at a premium in Europe, Leitner showcases technology which regulates the speed of a ropeway based on rider demand.
  • The nonprofit which has been running Big Squaw says the sale to Big Moose Development still hasn’t been completed and this season will continue as normal.
  • Sugarbush confirms a Heaven’s Gate replacement is in the works but it won’t happen in 2023 as lift prices surge and lead times increase.
  • Ropeway pioneer Willy Garaventa dies at the age of 88.
  • Los Angeles releases the Environmental Impact Statement for the Dodger Stadium gondola project.
  • Names for the five new Skytracs at Jack Frost Big Boulder are: Blue Heron, Harmony, Paradise, Pocono and Tobyhanna.
  • Groupe Le Massif remains interested in acquiring Mont-Sainte-Anne from Resorts of the Canadian Rockies and would also be open to acquiring Stoneham as part of a deal.
  • After multiple years of construction, Ontario’s Mt. Baldy finally has a new chairlift.
  • Mount Snow will sell more double, triple and quad chairs for charity.
  • New York’s Attorney General sues the owners of Labrador Mountain and Song Mountain, alleging their purchase and closure of nearby Toggenburg was anti-competitive. Former Toggenburg/current Greek Peak owner John Meier agreed to pay the State $195,000 and will cooperate in the case against Labrador and Song’s parent company.
  • The Governor of Utah throws his support behind the Little Cottonwood gondola project.
  • A new document shows where Mammoth’s relocated Panorama Gondola and new Big Bend chairlift would run as part of the Evolving Main project.
  • The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania again seeks an operator to revive the Denton Hill Ski Area.

News Roundup: Dueling Passes

News Roundup: Preferred Alternative

News Roundup: Moving Steel

News Roundup: Bike Season

News Roundup: Funding Secured

News Roundup: Mystery Solved

News Roundup: Final Rides

“The 2021 construction season was particularly challenging due to a number of unusual circumstances. The pandemic resulted in labor shortages for not only the lift construction crews and building teams, but also with the supply chain companies delivering key materials. Helicopter usage was a key component for construction, as they were required for activities including tree removal, setting of lift towers and pouring the foundations at the KT mid-station. Helicopter availability was greatly affected by one of the worst wildfire seasons in California history, and once helicopters were available, their operations were shut down as they could not safely fly in the smoky conditions. The fires also resulted in periods when the crews had to be sent home due to unhealthy air quality. For these reasons, construction could not be completed within the six-to-eight-month time frame anticipated in the EIS.”

News Roundup: Any Day Now